Art education – Art Sentinel http://artsentinel.net/ Thu, 24 Nov 2022 13:12:39 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://artsentinel.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/art-120x120.png Art education – Art Sentinel http://artsentinel.net/ 32 32 Christmas Decoration and Print Sale Help Send MC Arts Education Students to National Conference https://artsentinel.net/christmas-decoration-and-print-sale-help-send-mc-arts-education-students-to-national-conference/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 09:48:09 +0000 https://artsentinel.net/christmas-decoration-and-print-sale-help-send-mc-arts-education-students-to-national-conference/ Please note that this post contains affiliate links and any sales made through these links will reward MageeNews.com with a small commission – at no additional cost to you. Southeast Christmas trees will soon be adorned with multicolored angels, crosses, doves, state silhouettes – and even Mississippi College’s popular new brand – thanks to the […]]]>

Please note that this post contains affiliate links and any sales made through these links will reward MageeNews.com with a small commission – at no additional cost to you.

Southeast Christmas trees will soon be adorned with multicolored angels, crosses, doves, state silhouettes – and even Mississippi College’s popular new brand – thanks to the breathtaking work of student-artists MC.

Members of the Clinton community can decorate their rooms with original pieces and support MC senior art students on their way to the National Art Education Association convention by purchasing handmade Christmas decorations and prints during the holiday season.

Dr. Stephanie Busbea, art education coordinator and professor in MC’s Department of Art, said the annual sale has evolved over the past 15 years.

“We’ve learned for many years, but we’ve developed a system that works,” said Busbea, recipient of the NAEA’s 2022 Pre-Service Chapter Sponsor Excellence Award. “We try to get the students in the upper class, who have done it several times, to associate with the students in the lower class, so that they spend their time making ornaments and prints and making meet new students.

“The pressure of studying can get uncomfortable during the first year of college, and we try to make it a fun activity for our students.”

For arts education majors like Dani Henderson, a senior from Waynesboro, and Cate Stennett, a junior from Melissa, Texas, the annual sale provides an opportunity to express their creativity and learn how to market their work while building relationships that will last a lifetime.

“It’s something that all of the arts education majors come together and do as our fundraising group,” Henderson said. “We meet and do this different nights of the week. It’s a great way to get to know each other.

“We build relationships, which is important in education, but we also learn something that we can do with our future students.

The department’s friendly, “family” environment was new to Sennett, who grew up in a military family and moved around the country for most of his life.

“This arts community was one of the first places I felt like home,” Sennett said. “Working together on these pieces made me feel like I had a place where I belong.

From start to finish, student artists go through a meticulous process to ensure that the embellishments and prints they sell achieve a professional appearance.

The ornaments begin with a slab of clay that the student artists have cut into patterns and baked into bisque in a kiln. After removing them from the thermal chamber and allowing them to cool, student artists glaze each ornament by hand before returning them to the oven to be fired again, giving the ornaments a beautiful shiny finish. Student-artists cut pieces of string, shape them into nifty loops, and thread them through the finished pieces.

“I had never touched clay before coming to MC,” Stennett said. “I had no idea how to do this, but you learn by doing, and by second or third year you’ve become a pro.”

The embossed prints for sale range from donuts, lemons and oranges to ducks, koi fish and swans. Student artists carve designs into blocks of linoleum to make plates. They use a set of rollers – called a brayer – to apply ink to the block’s surface, then press the block onto high-quality paper to make a single impression.

Multiple prints on paper of different colors can be cut into segments and glued together to create unique collages. All prints and collages are pre-cut, pre-matted, signed by the artist, and ready to frame.

“It’s something we can do in our schools if we have linoleum available to us,” said Henderson, who aspires to become an arts educator. “Even if you don’t, you can make a similar style impression using foam or similar materials.

“It’s another form of art that we learn. I’ve never had a print before, so learning to carve linoleum is an important process for us and teaches us different techniques.

Stennett said the ability to make prints reinforces what she learned in MC’s printmaking classes.

“This project was like a quick preview of this class,” Stennett said. “We learn to carve in a lot of different materials. Two members of our group had taken the course, so it was helpful for the more experienced students to work with some of the less experienced ones on these impressions. »

Proceeds from the sale of ornaments and prints are used to pay senior art education students to attend the NAEA conference, a splendid networking opportunity for those about to enter the profession: approximately 7,000 art teachers from across the country attend the annual event.

“You meet different people from different organizations,” said Henderson, who attended the NAEA conference in New York in March. “We are also meeting with some of the art suppliers from across the country and starting to make connections. So when we’re in our classroom and need to order supplies in bulk or call another teacher from a nearby district, we have those connections.

“We also have the opportunity to take different trips to museums. (Participating in the sale of Christmas ornaments and prints) is a great way to support arts education and future educators.

Having the opportunity to see some of the most famous works of art in person could add value to the generations of students they will one day teach.

“Before coming to college, I had never visited art museums,” Henderson said. “When I went to the NAEA conference in New York, I was able to visit the Guggenheim and the Modern Museum of Art and the Met, which was an amazing experience.

“To be able to tell my future students that their teacher has been there and seen the great works of art they are studying is amazing.”

Selling ornaments and prints also helps MC student artists discover how to market their work and build a brand that can enhance their status as art instructors.

“It’s a great way to establish ourselves in the community, not just as arts educators, but as artists,” Henderson said. “When you sell your art, it adds to your credibility as a teacher who can create things that have monetary value as well as aesthetic value.”

Since the courtyard of the Samuel Gore Arts Complex, which houses a large kiln, is not yet complete, the student artists designed the ornaments in the ceramic room of the Aven Fine Arts building. However, they have glazed the pieces and prepared the prints in the state-of-the-art facility and look forward to permanently moving into the complex when it fully opens in the spring.

“Next year we will have two ceramic rooms – a wheel throwing room and a hand building room,” Stennett said. “When we’re working on these projects, we’ll be mostly in the hands-on room while other students can spin on the wheel, which will be nice.”

Individual embellishments are $10 each for multi-color or MC-branded pieces, and $7 each for single-color pieces; individual prints are $15.

Ornaments and prints will be available for sale from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Wednesday, November 28-30, in the BC Rogers Student Center cafeteria; from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. and from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. on Thursday, December 1 at the Communes in the basement of the hall of graduates; and from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Friday, December 2 in the Commons. Ornaments can also be ordered by emailing Laura Wingo, Fundraising Chair, at ljwingo@mc.edu.

MageeNews.com is an online news source covering Simpson and surrounding counties as well as the state of Mississippi.

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23rd Annual Destiny Award Luncheon: Illuminate Great Art, Education and Service – A Conversation with Sterling K. Brown https://artsentinel.net/23rd-annual-destiny-award-luncheon-illuminate-great-art-education-and-service-a-conversation-with-sterling-k-brown/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 05:57:25 +0000 https://artsentinel.net/23rd-annual-destiny-award-luncheon-illuminate-great-art-education-and-service-a-conversation-with-sterling-k-brown/ sterling k brown St. Philip’s School and Community Center will host its 23rd Annual Parrish Family Destiny Award Luncheon with a Conversation with Emmy and Golden Globe Award Winner Sterling K. Brown Wednesday March 3, 11:30 p.m. at the Hilton Anatole. The student showcase is from 10:30 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. Bis known for his […]]]>
sterling k brown

St. Philip’s School and Community Center will host its 23rd Annual Parrish Family Destiny Award Luncheon with a Conversation with Emmy and Golden Globe Award Winner Sterling K. Brown Wednesday March 3, 11:30 p.m. at the Hilton Anatole. The student showcase is from 10:30 a.m. to 11:15 a.m.

Bis known for his role in the critically acclaimed NBC drama series, THIS IS US, Brown also appeared in the hit film, Black Panther. A graduate of Stanford University with a Bachelor of Arts in Drama, before earning his Masters of Fine Arts from NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts, he currently resides in Los Angeles with his wife and two children. .

Over the past two decades, Brown has starred in more than 15 movies, 40 television shows, and six theater performances.

His dedication to the craft is represented in nominations and awards won at the Golden Globe Awards, Screen Actors Guild Awards, American Black Film Festival, BET Awards, NAACP Image Awards, Critics’ Choice Television Awards, and the list goes on.

In 2018, Brown formed Indian Meadows Productions as part of a pact with 20th Century Fox Television. The company’s core mandate is to champion diversity through the development and production of entertaining, educational and inclusive projects across multiple forms of media, including film, broadcast, cable and streaming.

Lunch co-chairs: Kacy and Carter Tolleson

Honorary Presidents: Diana and Todd Maclin

Recipient of the Mona and David Munson Humanitarian Award: Ellen and John McStay

The Destiny Awards are an annual luncheon to benefit St. Philip’s School and Community Center. The luncheon features incredible scholars, athletes and celebrities as keynote speakers and in moderated conversations. The Humanitarian Award is given to a local individual or couple who has demonstrated exceptional work in bridging diverse communities.

All funds raised will directly benefit services promoting Christian education, senior services, hunger, student engagement and athletics.

Sponsorships are now available

For more details, click herehttps://www.stphilips1600.org/destiny/

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Popsicle® helps bridge the art education gap with the Stick with Art! Competition https://artsentinel.net/popsicle-helps-bridge-the-art-education-gap-with-the-stick-with-art-competition/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 14:53:00 +0000 https://artsentinel.net/popsicle-helps-bridge-the-art-education-gap-with-the-stick-with-art-competition/ In partnership with the National Art Education Association and parent, actor and arts advocate, Kyla Prattthe online art contest is part of the brand’s ongoing commitment to helping students across the country stick to art. ENGLEWOOD CLIFFS, NJ, November 14, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Popsicle believes children’s imaginations are their greatest superpower and that when you […]]]>

In partnership with the National Art Education Association and parent, actor and arts advocate, Kyla Prattthe online art contest is part of the brand’s ongoing commitment to helping students across the country stick to art.

ENGLEWOOD CLIFFS, NJ, November 14, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Popsicle believes children’s imaginations are their greatest superpower and that when you unleash the imagination, amazing things can happen. After all, popsicles themselves were invented by a playing child! However, many students across the United States do not have the opportunity to fully develop and use their imaginations both in and out of the classroom, often due to inequitable funding for education programs. arts education in schools, leading to what experts call the arts education gap. .1

To help bridge this divide in arts education, Popsicle partners with the National Art Education Association (NAEA) and parents, actors and advocates for arts education. Kyla Prattto champion imaginative play and learning in classrooms and arts programs across the country with the Stay with the art! Competition. Stay with the art! will invite Title 1 art teachers to share their students’ creative, colorful and imaginative creations on social media for a chance to win $1,000 to help with the cost of art supplies for their students.

Without a strong arts education, students have fewer opportunities at school to engage creatively, but the World Economic Forum2 has consistently ranked creativity as one of the most important skills for the job market.3 Popsicle knows the power of creativity, that’s why the Stay with the art! The competition is the start of three years of Popsicle, $500,000 commitment to help bridge the gap in arts education through partnerships with expert nonprofit organizations in the field.

“Arts education is not an extracurricular activity; it is crucial and plays a huge role in all of our lives,” said Kyla Pratt. “That’s why I’m so excited to partner with Popsicle and NAEA to launch the national program Stay with the art! Competition to help bridge the arts education gap that many schools face. As a parent, the importance of using your imagination and creativity to create art runs deep in my family. I can’t wait to see all the craft stick creations imagined for the Popsicle Stay with the art! Competition!”

NAEA will act as an official non-profit partner of Popsicle supporting the Stay with the art! Competition. Founded in 1947, NAEA champions creative growth and innovation by equitably advancing tools and resources for high-quality education in the visual arts, design, and media arts to diverse populations and communities of practice.

“As a brand that believes in the power of creativity and imagination, it’s an exciting time to launch the Stay with the art! contest and Popsicle’s continued commitment to helping more children embrace art,” said Russell Lilly, President, Unilever Ice Cream North America. “This program, in partnership with NAEA, will allow arts education programs to thrive and provide students with a dedicated space to develop their creativity and imagination, while providing the necessary support for visual arts educators in the face of growing budgetary challenges. Popsicle is proud to make a meaningful contribution and support programs that will make a real difference for the next generation. »

While some schools may support an ongoing commitment to arts education, the growing gap in arts education does not impact all children equally.

Since the mid-1980s:

  • Black students experienced a 49% reduction in arts education1
  • Hispanic/Latin students experienced a 40% reduction in arts education1
  • Children from low-income families experienced a 77% reduction in arts education1
  • White students experienced virtually 0% reduction in arts education1

To make up for the lack of funding for art programs in schools, teachers often have to purchase supplies out of their own pockets. Studies show that, on average, teachers spend $750 each year on school supplies.4 Popsicle believes that arts education should be accessible to everyone. That’s why Popsicle created the Stay with the art! Contest– Popsicle wants to help fund art teachers who fuel our children’s imaginations and creativity.

To participate, Title 1 visual arts teachers — who serve diverse and underresourced communities — will be invited to share their students’ creative, colorful, and imaginative stick creations to their own Instagram accounts. Each submission must be made using the hashtag #StickWithArtContest and tagging @Popsicle and the photo submission must feature the Popsicle stick creation (no students or teachers should be included in the photos).

From these submissions, 40 teachers will be chosen to win $1,000 to help with the cost of art supplies for their students. These 40 teachers will then be invited to apply for a grant for their school to support the arts by sharing their need for school-wide arts funding and a commitment to teaching strategies for equity, diversity and inclusion and access to the arts for all students. Schools with four teachers will receive $10,000 to support the arts and school one lucky teacher will receive $20,000 to support the arts! All winners will be selected by a panel of NAEA representatives and announced in 2023.

“NAEA is thrilled to partner with Popsicle to advocate for equitable access to visual arts education for students nationwide,” said Mario R. Rossero, Executive Director of NAEA. “We work every day to advance arts education, and the Stay with the art! The competition reinforces this important responsibility by directly supporting visual arts educators who catalyze student innovation and creative problem solving. »

Through the Stay with the art! Contest, Popsicle is excited to help teachers and schools spark the imagination and creativity of students, and support more equitable access to arts education across the United States.

NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. Void where prohibited. The Staff with Art! The contest is sponsored by Conopco, Inc., d/b/a Unilever. Open to legal residents of the 50 United States and DC, 18 years and older, who are art teachers of a child ages 6-18 and have created or plan to create Popsicle sticks in their classroom. Begins to 12:00 p.m. ET on 11/14/22 & ends 11:59 p.m. ET on 12/18/22. For official rules, eligibility, odds, limits, prize descriptions and full details, visit unileversweepsrules.com/popsiclepurpose/.

ABOUT POPSICLE
As a brand invented by an 11-year-old, Popsicle has always created opportunities for kids to play more often and use their imaginations, from the vibrant colors and flavors of Popsicle products to upcycled crafts with Popsicle. The sticks. For more information about Popsicle, visit www.popsicle.com, or follow @Popsicle on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. For the product locator, please visit www.popsicle.com/storelocator.

ABOUT UNILEVER NORTH AMERICA
Unilever is one of the world’s leading providers of beauty and personal care, home care and food and refreshment products, with sales in more than 190 countries and products used by 2.5 billion people each day. We have 149,000 employees and generated revenue of €50.7 billion in 2020. More than half of our footprint is in developing and emerging markets. We have around 400 brands in homes around the world. In United States and Canadathe portfolio includes iconic brands such as: Dove, Knorr, Hellmann’s, Lipton, Magnum, Axe, Degree, Dollar Shave Club, Q-tips, Seventh Generation, St. Ives, Suave, TRESemmé and Vaseline.

Our vision is to be the global leader in sustainable business and to demonstrate how our future-oriented, forward-looking business model drives superior performance. We have a long tradition of progressive and responsible business. It dates back to the time of our founder Guillaume Levierthat launched the world’s first useful brand, Sunlight Soap, over 100 years ago, and it’s at the heart of how we run our business today.

Unilever Compass, our sustainable business strategy, is designed to help us deliver superior performance and drive sustainable and responsible growth, while:

  • improve the health of the planet
  • improve people’s health, confidence and well-being
  • contribute to a fairer and more socially inclusive world.

While much more needs to be done, we are proud to have been recognized in 2020 as an industry leader in the Dow Jones Sustainability Index and – for the tenth consecutive year – as the highest ranked company in the Dow Jones Sustainability Index. 2020 GlobeScan/SustainAbility Sustainability Leaders Survey.

For more information about Unilever US and its brands, visit: www.unileverusa.com

For more information about Unilever Canada and its brands, visit: www.unilever.ca

ABOUT THE NATIONAL ARTS EDUCATION ASSOCIATION
The National Art Education Association (NAEA) is the leading professional organization serving arts educators in schools, universities, museums and community settings. Founded in 1947, NAEA champions creative growth and innovation by equitably advancing tools and resources for high-quality education in the visual arts, design, and media arts to diverse populations and communities of practice.

Media Contacts
Isabelle Friend
[email protected]

1 American Academy of Arts & Sciences.org
2 World Economic Forum
3 LinkedIn
4 Adopt a

Popsicle SOURCE

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Children’s Day 2022: Reasons why arts education is beneficial for children’s early learning https://artsentinel.net/childrens-day-2022-reasons-why-arts-education-is-beneficial-for-childrens-early-learning/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 06:23:32 +0000 https://artsentinel.net/childrens-day-2022-reasons-why-arts-education-is-beneficial-for-childrens-early-learning/ By Manya Roongta and Krish Nawal Arts education imparts knowledge beyond arts and crafts in various disciplines like music, dance, drama, performing arts, etc. Recognition of arts education is relatively lower in India as there are fewer people taking it. But contrary to the notion, arts education plays a vital role in the development of […]]]>

By Manya Roongta and Krish Nawal

Arts education imparts knowledge beyond arts and crafts in various disciplines like music, dance, drama, performing arts, etc. Recognition of arts education is relatively lower in India as there are fewer people taking it. But contrary to the notion, arts education plays a vital role in the development of a child’s personality, developing creative expression and sharpening their senses.

holistic development

Today, every industry and every job demands innovation, creativity, original ideas and impeccable interpersonal skills. This is why schools need to inculcate arts education in their curricula to ensure the holistic and creative development of students from an early age. Art teaches children technological skills and life skills such as critical awareness, independence, problem solving, concentration, patience and perseverance and thus prepares them for adulthood.

Stimulates creativity

For starters, arts education encourages creativity and engagement beyond conventional methods. Students are not locked into the web of cramming facts and are motivated to explore their interests. They have a free hand to draw inspiration from any source and build their own artistic work.

Read also | How can an online degree create impact and generate jobs in India?

Improves cognitive skills

Simple activities such as holding crayons, coloring, cutting, drawing, stroking with paintbrushes, dancing, playing, etc., help students develop their fine motor skills with this hands-on teaching approach. Art also helps children understand the practice of cause and effect. For example, using scissors will help cut the paper into shapes, pushing the pencils harder will color the drawings that much darker, different steps in sync with the music when sequenced together will make a dance show, etc.

Foster understanding of teamwork and accepting mistakes

If you want children to understand complex and sensitive topics such as teamwork, group learning, etc., then art education is the way to go. Bring the kids together, give them a goal to achieve, and they’ll understand how working as a team will help them pursue their creative interests and easily achieve the common goal. This is when they also learn to balance their emotions, take responsibility for situations, understand the importance of empathy, and accept their mistakes.

Instills decision-making skills, self-confidence and self-motivation

Students also learn critical thinking skills as they must first plan and eventually follow the roadmap to create their masterpieces. When handcrafting a work of art, they are the ones who decide, because the field of creativity is limitless. Therefore, arts education plays a vital role in developing students’ decision-making skills and boosting their self-confidence. Children also have the chance to explore, become self-taught and be independent in the face of various challenges while motivating themselves to stay focused on their goals.

Improves concentration levels

The saying “all work and no play” is relevant to children. Long hours of studying without any extracurricular activities can make them boring and affect their personality development. Usually perceived as a hobby and a diversion from studies, art helps students improve their academic performance. Even an hour of artistic activity of their own can improve their concentration levels and help them stay focused on their studies.

to summarize

Immersing yourself in arts education in all its forms broadens students’ outlook on life and makes them independent. It helps them understand the importance of decision making, owning up to one’s faults and the power to create a work of art independently despite all the obstacles. Arts education, with its myriad of benefits, helps students instill valuable life lessons and skills. It also gives them a safe zone to practice a wide range of skills and motivates them to perform better academically. With Children’s Day fast approaching, what better way to promote arts education as an indispensable tool for holistic child development!

(The authors are the founders of the Children’s Art Museum of India. The opinions expressed are personal and do not reflect the official position or policy of FinancialExpress.com.)

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Davis & Elkins Host State Arts Education Association Conference | News, Sports, Jobs https://artsentinel.net/davis-elkins-host-state-arts-education-association-conference-news-sports-jobs/ Fri, 21 Oct 2022 07:27:15 +0000 https://artsentinel.net/davis-elkins-host-state-arts-education-association-conference-news-sports-jobs/ ELKINS – Art educators from across West Virginia will gather in the newly renovated Myles Center for the Arts on the Davis & Elkins College campus on October 21-22 for the annual conference of the West Virginia Art Education Association (WVAEA ). This is the first time D&E has hosted the conference since […]]]>

ELKINS – Art educators from across West Virginia will gather in the newly renovated Myles Center for the Arts on the Davis & Elkins College campus on October 21-22 for the annual conference of the West Virginia Art Education Association (WVAEA ). This is the first time D&E has hosted the conference since the association was founded in the mid-1970s.

The two-day event gives art educators the opportunity to learn new arts and crafts and techniques for teaching art, as well as build professional connections and community relationships. Attendees will have a choice of presentations from 19 instructors, including master plein air painter Eric Dye.

“We are very pleased to host the conference at Davis & Elkins College so that we can showcase the many talents of art educators in our community and the College, as well as the art programs supported here,” said Tessa Garver-Daniels, assistant professor in the D&E Division of Creative Arts and conference coordinator.

Artist and President Emeritus of Davis & Elkins College Trustee June Myles has been chosen as the guest artist. An arts philanthropist, Myles’ generous donations made possible the recent $6.7 million expansion of the Myles Center for the Arts and Myles Plaza.

Myles fiber art crochet rugs and paintings will be on display in the Paull Gallery and in display cases in the atrium of the Harper-McNeeley Auditorium. She will sell books of her work and donate the proceeds to WVAEA.

The conference will also feature keynote speaker Heather Harris, Head of Educational Programs at West Virginia University Museum of Art. She will present an object lesson on “Unleashing the Educational Potential of Museums.”

Alongside Myles’ gallery exhibition, art educators will present their own work and that of their students in two separate exhibitions. Student work will be highlighted in the area of ​​self-portraiture. Teachers will exhibit their personal work for jury selection and prizes. This year’s juror is Elkins native artist and educator Vincent Trimboli.

Last year, the WVAEA won recognition for the largest membership in the NAEA Eastern Region and hopes to continue the trend of membership growth in the Elkins region.

D&E’s Creative Arts program provides foundational training in art, problem solving, and the creative process for all students. Students develop an understanding of complex and sophisticated visual language and are prepared for a professional career in art, art education, and/or graduate school.



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Five Midview Students’ Work to Be Featured in Ohio Art Education Association’s Emerging Artists Exhibit – Morning Journal https://artsentinel.net/five-midview-students-work-to-be-featured-in-ohio-art-education-associations-emerging-artists-exhibit-morning-journal/ Thu, 29 Sep 2022 18:02:27 +0000 https://artsentinel.net/five-midview-students-work-to-be-featured-in-ohio-art-education-associations-emerging-artists-exhibit-morning-journal/ The Ohio Art Education Association has announced that five students from Midview High School will be featured in its annual Emerging Artists Exhibit. The students created the artwork during the 2021-22 school year, according to a news release. The students are Riley Willard, Grade 12; Sesen Keith, 11th grade; Isabella Griffiths, 10th grade; Jackie Janus, […]]]>

The Ohio Art Education Association has announced that five students from Midview High School will be featured in its annual Emerging Artists Exhibit.

The students created the artwork during the 2021-22 school year, according to a news release.

The students are Riley Willard, Grade 12; Sesen Keith, 11th grade; Isabella Griffiths, 10th grade; Jackie Janus, 10th grade; and Avah Perry, 10th grade.

Their works are exhibited at the King Arts Complex, 835 Mount Vernon Ave. in Columbus, through October 29.

“Helping students become artists, critical thinkers, makers and creators is such a rewarding experience, especially when organizations like the OAEA take note of their accomplishments,” said Heather Burns, visual arts teacher at Midview High School, in the release. “Having artwork displayed in the Emerging Artists Exhibit is a true testament to the creativity, talent and hard work of each student.”

As a professional organization of over 2,000 art teachers in Ohio, the Ohio Art Education Association promotes art education through several professional endeavors, including sponsoring various student art exhibits at the national and regional, according to the press release.

The Emerging Artists Exhibition is designed to motivate and inspire new artists to excel in the fields of drawing, painting, sculpture, crafts, computer art, photography and printing. , according to the press release.

This year, 195 works of art were selected from eight regions across the state for the juried exhibit, according to the release.

“On behalf of the local Midview school community, I want to extend my sincere congratulations to this talented group of students,” Midview High School principal Brian Siftar said in the statement. “Their creativity and dedication to their craft is truly inspiring.

The Ohio Art Education Association will recognize the featured students and their respective art teachers at a celebratory reception on Oct. 29, according to the release.

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Five Midview Students’ Work to Be Featured in Ohio Art Education Association’s Emerging Artists Exhibit – Morning Journal https://artsentinel.net/five-midview-students-work-to-be-featured-in-ohio-art-education-associations-emerging-artists-exhibit-morning-journal-2/ Thu, 29 Sep 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://artsentinel.net/five-midview-students-work-to-be-featured-in-ohio-art-education-associations-emerging-artists-exhibit-morning-journal-2/ The Ohio Art Education Association has announced that five students from Midview High School will be featured in its annual Emerging Artists Exhibit. The students created the artwork during the 2021-22 school year, according to a news release. The students are Riley Willard, Grade 12; Sesen Keith, 11th grade; Isabella Griffiths, 10th grade; Jackie Janus, […]]]>

The Ohio Art Education Association has announced that five students from Midview High School will be featured in its annual Emerging Artists Exhibit.

The students created the artwork during the 2021-22 school year, according to a news release.

The students are Riley Willard, Grade 12; Sesen Keith, 11th grade; Isabella Griffiths, 10th grade; Jackie Janus, 10th grade; and Avah Perry, 10th grade.

Their works are exhibited at the King Arts Complex, 835 Mount Vernon Ave. in Columbus, through October 29.

“Helping students become artists, critical thinkers, makers and creators is such a rewarding experience, especially when organizations like the OAEA take note of their accomplishments,” said Heather Burns, visual arts teacher at Midview High School, in the release. “Having artwork displayed in the Emerging Artists Exhibit is a true testament to the creativity, talent and hard work of each student.”

As a professional organization of over 2,000 art teachers in Ohio, the Ohio Art Education Association promotes art education through several professional endeavors, including sponsoring various student art exhibits at the national and regional, according to the press release.

The Emerging Artists Exhibition is designed to motivate and inspire new artists to excel in the fields of drawing, painting, sculpture, crafts, computer art, photography and printing. , according to the press release.

This year, 195 works of art were selected from eight regions across the state for the juried exhibit, according to the release.

“On behalf of the local Midview schools community, I want to extend my sincere congratulations to this talented group of students,” Midview High School Principal Brian Siftar said in the statement. “Their creativity and dedication to their craft is truly inspiring.

The Ohio Art Education Association will recognize the featured students and their respective art teachers at a celebratory reception on Oct. 29, according to the release.

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How Bruce Onobrakpeya passes on his legacy through informal arts education https://artsentinel.net/how-bruce-onobrakpeya-passes-on-his-legacy-through-informal-arts-education/ Sun, 25 Sep 2022 04:24:32 +0000 https://artsentinel.net/how-bruce-onobrakpeya-passes-on-his-legacy-through-informal-arts-education/ Bruce Onobrakpeya exhibited some of his works at the University of Abuja while presenting the 2022 Laureates Conference as a recipient of the Nigeria National Order of Merit (NNOM) Meritorious Award. He received the award to promote and reward academic and other achievements in 2017. The nonagenarian, as expected of all NNOM laureates, delivered a […]]]>

Bruce Onobrakpeya exhibited some of his works at the University of Abuja while presenting the 2022 Laureates Conference as a recipient of the Nigeria National Order of Merit (NNOM) Meritorious Award. He received the award to promote and reward academic and other achievements in 2017. The nonagenarian, as expected of all NNOM laureates, delivered a laureate lecture focusing on his harmattan workshops.

Bruce Onobrakpeya is a world renowned master printmaker. The painter, sculptor, poet and pioneer of modern African art is no stranger to world art. The living legend has won several awards including the Living Human Treasure awarded by the Federal Government of Nigeria in collaboration with UNESCO. His works can be found in iconic locations around the world, including the Vatican Museum in Rome; the Museum of African Art, Washington; the Tate Art Gallery in London.

Inside the sad state of Benue Library

The Abuja Literary and Arts Festival is held in October

But the Delta State native, whose contemporaries include the late Yusuf Grillo, holds something more important than the awards – mentorship having benefited from the mentorship of Ben Enwonwu, Nora Majekodunmi and others.

This inspired him to create an informal art training workshop where young art lovers are educated in a relaxed and free atmosphere, without the rigid framework associated with formal art schools and academies.

He said Harmattan Workshops, held at Onobrak Art Centre, is an informal art school in Delta State. It is an educational device intended to help, develop and perpetuate creation in the field of the arts, in particular the visual arts.

The recipient of the Nigerian National Order of Merit (NNOM) during the presentation of the 2022 award The winners conference, a prerequisite for all NNOM winners of the Nigeria National Merit Award from the University of Abuja, demonstrated the importance of mentorship and how he had consciously passed on his legacy to younger generations through a training session intense artistry which he labeled Ateliers Harmattan.

Entitled his article “Informal Art Education through Workshops: Lessons from Harmattan Workshops”, he said that the most important gain from Harmattan workshops is that they provide a platform that brings together artists from different backgrounds and different levels of development.

“Les Ateliers de l’Harmattan are an informal structure where artists meet, reflect, experiment and share ideas. They are designed to help develop and support creative endeavors in the arts, especially the visual arts,” he said, adding that Harmattan workshops are run by a non-governmental organization, the Bruce Onobrakpeya Foundation, and governed by a board of directors on which he served as chairman.

The establishment of the Onobrak Art Center where the Harmattan Workshops are held dates back to 1984 when he acquired a seven-acre piece of land on the outskirts of Agbarha-Otor. Although development began in 1998, the center has been transformed with modern and traditional art facilities.

He said the center also houses the Onobrak Museum where artists see and learn first-hand from a collection of experimental works spread across the walls and floors of the main building. On display, he said, are the works of the participants of the Ateliers de l’Harmattan and especially its collection of arts and crafts as well as contemporary African works of art.

Onobrakpeya through the Harmattan workshops revives art forms whose techniques have been almost completely lost to current and future generations of Nigerian artists. Among these techniques is the stone carving of Esie which he says was facilitated in the workshops by Dr. Oladapo Afolayan of Auchi Polytechnic. He said the forge which was threatened with extinction was reintroduced by John Crawford, an American animator from New York.

“During the 24th Harmattan Workshops, one of the facilitators spent the entire period demonstrating the lost art of mat weaving as it is practiced in Urhobo land.

“We are currently engaged in the restoration and reinstallation of the majestic altarpieces by Yusuf Grillo which were demolished from All Saints Church, Montgomery Road, Yaba, Lagos. Once completed, we will re-engage with the aesthetic and spiritual beauty generated by the two panels,” he said.

He said the Harmattan workshops fulfill a major objective of helping to discover, train and encourage young Nigerian talent to hone their skills, creative strengths and ideas.

“The aim is to correct the general perception or misconception in our society, where art is not seen as a serious or viable career or socio-economic concern and therefore as part of our heritage, worthy of the highest esteem,” he said.

He said participants in Harmattan workshops are reviving traditional culture, including festivals that have suffered some decline.

Beneficiaries of the center include Afuevu Onakufe, Benjamin Akemor and Patrick Akpojotor.

He said he runs the center with a certain percentage of his art sales, grants and support from individuals, companies and international organizations. He said, however, that funding was insufficient, adding that the center needed new and properly equipped studios, fair remuneration for facilitators and other staff.

Despite the challenges, he expressed his wish that the Ateliers de l’Harmattan will one day place Agbarta-Otor on the world cultural stage.

“The Mbari Mbayo Art Workshops and the Duro Ladipo Theater created a cultural awareness and the atmosphere that helped bring attention to the Osun Festival and the works of Susanne Wenger and other artists who eventually made Oshogbo a World Heritage Site. I envision the same happening in Agbarha-Otor where the highest masquerades in Africa happen every 15 years,” he said.

He also exhibited some of his works to the admiration of guests including the Vice Chancellor of the University of Abuja, Prof. Abdul-Rasheed Na’Allah.

The Vice Chancellor commended Onobrakpeya for his contributions to art and his exemplary lifestyle. He urged students to follow in his footsteps.

Additionally, Minister of Special and Intergovernmental Affairs Senator George Akume praised Onobrakpeya’s contributions to arts education.

Senator Akume, who was represented by Professor Bolaji Babalola, said art may be focused for some as it is a loose word that encompasses a wide variety of practices that involve expressing oneself in different ways such as music, theater, sculpture.

“But the focus here is on the fine arts, especially the visual arts whose products are to be appreciated aesthetically or for their intellectual content, or both,” he said.

He said the exhibit offered scenes that portrayed social harmony and appreciation for diversity and portrayed how art brings peace and unity.

NNMA Board Chairman, Prof. Shekarau Yakubu Aku said 79 distinguished Nigerians had received the prestigious NNOM awards between 1979 and 2022.

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How Bruce Onobrakpeya passes on his legacy through informal arts education https://artsentinel.net/how-bruce-onobrakpeya-passes-on-his-legacy-through-informal-arts-education-2/ Sun, 25 Sep 2022 04:24:32 +0000 https://artsentinel.net/how-bruce-onobrakpeya-passes-on-his-legacy-through-informal-arts-education-2/ Bruce Onobrakpeya exhibited some of his works at the University of Abuja while presenting the 2022 Laureates Conference as a recipient of the Nigeria National Order of Merit (NNOM) Meritorious Award. He received the award to promote and reward academic and other achievements in 2017. The nonagenarian, as expected of all NNOM laureates, delivered a […]]]>

Bruce Onobrakpeya exhibited some of his works at the University of Abuja while presenting the 2022 Laureates Conference as a recipient of the Nigeria National Order of Merit (NNOM) Meritorious Award. He received the award to promote and reward academic and other achievements in 2017. The nonagenarian, as expected of all NNOM laureates, delivered a laureate lecture focusing on his harmattan workshops.

Bruce Onobrakpeya is a world renowned master printmaker. The painter, sculptor, poet and pioneer of modern African art is no stranger to world art. The living legend has won several awards including the Living Human Treasure awarded by the Federal Government of Nigeria in collaboration with UNESCO. His works can be found in iconic locations around the world, including the Vatican Museum in Rome; the Museum of African Art, Washington; the Tate Art Gallery in London.

Inside the sad state of Benue Library

The Abuja Literary and Arts Festival is held in October

This inspired him to create an informal art training workshop where young art lovers are educated in a relaxed and free atmosphere, without the rigid framework associated with formal art schools and academies.

He said Harmattan Workshops, held at Onobrak Art Centre, is an informal art school in Delta State. It is an educational device intended to help, develop and perpetuate creation in the field of the arts, in particular the visual arts.

The recipient of the Nigerian National Order of Merit (NNOM) during the presentation of the 2022 award The winners conference, a prerequisite for all NNOM winners of the Nigeria National Merit Award from the University of Abuja, demonstrated the importance of mentorship and how he had consciously passed on his legacy to younger generations through a training session intense artistry which he labeled Ateliers Harmattan.

Entitled his article “Informal Art Education through Workshops: Lessons from Harmattan Workshops”, he said that the most important gain from Harmattan workshops is that they provide a platform that brings together artists from different backgrounds and different levels of development.

“Les Ateliers de l’Harmattan are an informal structure where artists meet, reflect, experiment and share ideas. They are designed to help develop and support creative endeavors in the arts, especially the visual arts,” he said, adding that Harmattan workshops are run by a non-governmental organization, the Bruce Onobrakpeya Foundation, and governed by a board of directors on which he served as chairman.

The establishment of the Onobrak Art Center where the Harmattan Workshops are held dates back to 1984 when he acquired a seven-acre piece of land on the outskirts of Agbarha-Otor. Although development began in 1998, the center has been transformed with modern and traditional art facilities.

He said the center also houses the Onobrak Museum where artists see and learn first-hand from a collection of experimental works spread across the walls and floors of the main building. On display, he said, are the works of the participants of the Ateliers de l’Harmattan and especially its collection of arts and crafts as well as contemporary African works of art.

Onobrakpeya through the Harmattan workshops revives art forms whose techniques have been almost completely lost to current and future generations of Nigerian artists. Among these techniques is the stone carving of Esie which he says was facilitated in the workshops by Dr. Oladapo Afolayan of Auchi Polytechnic. He said the forge which was threatened with extinction was reintroduced by John Crawford, an American animator from New York.

“During the 24th Harmattan Workshops, one of the facilitators spent the entire period demonstrating the lost art of mat weaving as it is practiced in Urhobo land.

“We are currently engaged in the restoration and reinstallation of the majestic altarpieces by Yusuf Grillo which were demolished from All Saints Church, Montgomery Road, Yaba, Lagos. Once completed, we will re-engage with the aesthetic and spiritual beauty generated by the two panels,” he said.

He said the Harmattan workshops fulfill a major objective of helping to discover, train and encourage young Nigerian talent to hone their skills, creative strengths and ideas.

“The aim is to correct the general perception or misconception in our society, where art is not seen as a serious or viable career or socio-economic concern and therefore as part of our heritage, worthy of the highest esteem,” he said.

He said participants in Harmattan workshops are reviving traditional culture, including festivals that have suffered some decline.

Beneficiaries of the center include Afuevu Onakufe, Benjamin Akemor and Patrick Akpojotor.

He said he runs the center with a certain percentage of his art sales, grants and support from individuals, companies and international organizations. He said, however, that funding was insufficient, adding that the center needed new and properly equipped studios, fair remuneration for facilitators and other staff.

Despite the challenges, he expressed his wish that the Ateliers de l’Harmattan will one day place Agbarta-Otor on the world cultural stage.

“The Mbari Mbayo Art Workshops and the Duro Ladipo Theater created a cultural awareness and the atmosphere that helped bring attention to the Osun Festival and the works of Susanne Wenger and other artists who eventually made Oshogbo a World Heritage Site. I envision the same happening in Agbarha-Otor where the highest masquerades in Africa happen every 15 years,” he said.

He also exhibited some of his works to the admiration of guests including the Vice Chancellor of the University of Abuja, Prof. Abdul-Rasheed Na’Allah.

The Vice Chancellor commended Onobrakpeya for his contributions to art and his exemplary lifestyle. He urged students to follow in his footsteps.

Additionally, Minister of Special Duties and Intergovernmental Affairs Senator George Akume praised Onobrakpeya’s contributions to arts education.

Senator Akume, who was represented by Professor Bolaji Babalola, said art may be focused for some as it is a loose word that encompasses a wide variety of practices that involve expressing oneself in different ways such as music, theater, sculpture.

“But the focus here is on the fine arts, especially the visual arts whose products are to be appreciated aesthetically or for their intellectual content, or both,” he said.

He said the exhibit offered scenes that portrayed social harmony and appreciation for diversity and portrayed how art brings peace and unity.

NNMA Board Chairman, Prof. Shekarau Yakubu Aku said 79 distinguished Nigerians had received the prestigious NNOM awards between 1979 and 2022.

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Schuylkill Walk In Center Creates Arts Education Center – Times News Online https://artsentinel.net/schuylkill-walk-in-center-creates-arts-education-center-times-news-online/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://artsentinel.net/schuylkill-walk-in-center-creates-arts-education-center-times-news-online/ The Schuylkill Walk In Art Center recently unveiled its new Art Education Center and has introduced a full program of classes for adults and children. “Our class schedule is a mix of what we call ‘basic’ classes and one or two night classes for special projects or the classic Paint ‘n Sips,” said Heather Butler, […]]]> ]]>